When to use zero-premium FX collar options as the method of hedging

If it is not wise to always hedge via zero-premium collar options and you should never pay a premium to buy outright call and put currency options – what is the right approach?

fx forward points

Calculating fx forward points

Since it was first published in 2014 thousands have benefited from this blog’s common-sense approach to a common misunderstanding. It relates to the calculation of foreign exchange (FX) forward points.

FX risk Wine importers and exporters

FX Risk for Wine Importers and Exporters

In working with wine companies over the years the Hedgebook team has a real appreciation for the complexity of managing FX risk for wine importers and exporters.

Know your position: FX Volatility, friend or foe?

The FX market is no stranger to volatility. Whether it is global economic or political uncertainties, or a country’s interest rate outlook, they all play out in the currency markets. The constant push and pull…

Hedging, and a deeper look into the types of Financial Hedges

Financial hedging involves buying and selling foreign exchange instruments that are dealt by banks and foreign exchange brokers. There are three common types of instruments used: forward contracts, currency options, and currency swaps.

The Benefits of Hedging, and Managing FX Risk: Part 2

Managing this FX risk faced by importers and exporters all over the globe today is a three-step process: identify FX risk; develop a strategy; and utilized the proper instruments/strategies to hedge the risk.

The Benefits of Hedging, and Managing FX Risk: Part 1

Many small- and medium-sized firms engaging in import and/or export activity tend not to hedge. The reasons not to hedge come in all shapes and sizes: it’s too complex; it’s too costly; there’s a misconception that it is speculation; or even that that firms don’t know about hedging tools and strategies available to them.

Explaining Different Types of Exposure Risk

Importers and exporters alike face foreign exchange risk, or currency risk, when engaging in economic activity outside of their domestic currency. As explained in an earlier blog post, currency risk materializes for exporters when exchange rate volatility results in the company repatriating fewer revenues abroad, when the domestic currency strengthens relative to the foreign currency. For importers, this risk is the exact opposite: currency risk materializes when the domestic currency weakens relative to the foreign currency.

An Introduction to Currency Risk for Importers and Exporters

Import and export companies face the daunting task of dealing with foreign exchange risk that can easily alter revenues from overseas; with smaller cash reserves, exchange rate fluctuations can be the difference between profits and losses.