Will auditors enforce CVA compliance?

There is no doubt that CVA (credit value adjustment) and DVA (debit value adjustment) is rapidly becoming front of mind as corporations who have a 31 December balance date and outstanding financial instruments discover something…

IFRS 13: Fair value measurement – Credit Value Adjustment

The purpose of this blog is to examine IFRS 13 as it relates to the Credit Value Adjustment (CVA) of a financial instrument. In the post GFC environment, greater focus has been given to the…

Credit Value Adjustment

Credit Value Adjustment or CVA has been around for a long time, however, with the introduction of the accounting standard IFRS13, this year there is a requirement to understand it a bit better. The new…

Hedgebook acquires financial data services company Infoscan

We’re pleased to announce our acquisition of New Zealand-based financial data services company Infoscan. In a move designed to augment the existing Hedgebook offering as well as create new IP, we see the acquisition as a key…

Hedging, and a deeper look into the types of Financial Hedges

Financial hedging involves buying and selling foreign exchange instruments that are dealt by banks and foreign exchange brokers. There are three common types of instruments used: forward contracts, currency options, and currency swaps.

The Benefits of Hedging, and Managing FX Risk: Part 2

Managing this FX risk faced by importers and exporters all over the globe today is a three-step process: identify FX risk; develop a strategy; and utilized the proper instruments/strategies to hedge the risk.

The Benefits of Hedging, and Managing FX Risk: Part 1

Many small- and medium-sized firms engaging in import and/or export activity tend not to hedge. The reasons not to hedge come in all shapes and sizes: it’s too complex; it’s too costly; there’s a misconception that it is speculation; or even that that firms don’t know about hedging tools and strategies available to them.

Explaining Different Types of Exposure Risk

Importers and exporters alike face foreign exchange risk, or currency risk, when engaging in economic activity outside of their domestic currency. As explained in an earlier blog post, currency risk materializes for exporters when exchange rate volatility results in the company repatriating fewer revenues abroad, when the domestic currency strengthens relative to the foreign currency. For importers, this risk is the exact opposite: currency risk materializes when the domestic currency weakens relative to the foreign currency.

An Introduction to Currency Risk for Importers and Exporters

Import and export companies face the daunting task of dealing with foreign exchange risk that can easily alter revenues from overseas; with smaller cash reserves, exchange rate fluctuations can be the difference between profits and losses.

Hedging Basics: Currency Swaps

A currency swap locks in a price of a currency pair and is another tool that can be used to manage an organisation’s cash flow. It pays the fixed-price buyer of a currency pair a payout equal to the difference between the current price and the settlement price of the swap.

Hedging Basics: Average Price Currency Options

Movements between currency pairs can be swift and choppy. Using average price currency options can be a significant help in smoothing a corporation’s cash flows.

Hedging Basics: A Currency Pair Risk Reversal

Learn about one of the most interesting strategies used by investors or treasurers to hedge their exposures to the currency markets: risk reversal.